Teachers’ Summer Reading List for Reformy Billionaires: Books to Inspire Billionaires to Change their Reformy Ideas — Multiple Choice Test to Follow

Dear Bill and Melinda,

Bill and Melinda, we noted your Facebook post today that states: 

“I’m an avid reader, and Melinda and I encourage our kids to read too.

Here are a few summer reading ideas for children of all ages:http://b-gat.es/14m59CR

Your link leads to your “Summer  Reading List: Summer Reading: 18 Books That Will Inspire Your Kids on your Gates Foundation “Impatient Optimists” blog.

Since you state that you and Melinda are avid readers, teachers from around the country have created a very special Summer Reading List for you, Melinda, and all the reformy billionaires:

Teachers’ Summer Reading List for Billionaires:  Books to Inspire Billionaires to Change their Reformy Ideas — Multiple Choice Test to Follow

Here is our annotated bibliography:

Teachers’ Summer Reading List for Reformy Billionaires – An Annotated Bibliography by Teachers’ Letters To Bill Gates – June 26, 2013

  1. Adams, PhD., Marilee. Teaching That Changes Lives 10 Mindset Tools for Igniting the Love of Learning.. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Pub, 2013. Print. “Teaching is more than imparting facts and skills—it’s preparing students for the test of life. Featuring an innovative, easy-to-follow workbook and access to a Learner Mindset online mini-course , this inspiring book will ensure that teachers and students alike become creative, resilient problem solvers, bridge builders, and lifelong learners.” ~ Amazon
  2. Bailey, Nancy E.. Misguided education reform: debating the impact on students. Lanham, MD: R&L Education, 2013. Print. “The Trouble with Testing and Common Core State Standards” chapter alone, is worth the price of the book. The author clearly substantiates the nonsense, abuses and frauds associated with the high-stakes testing movement. The discussion about the Common Core State Standards clearly illustrates how non K-12 individuals devised the core to belittle teachers and the public schools. The author notes that no formative evaluation has ever been part of any of the testing movements. And, then notes the total lack of pilot testing on the current vogue of achievement tests. This is must read chapter by all educational policy makers. (Donald C. Orlich, professor emeritus, Washington State University; coauthor “Teaching Strategies: A Guide to Effective Instruction”) 
  3. Bale, Jeff, Sarah Knopp, and Jesse Hagopian. Education and capitalism: struggles for learning and liberation. Chicago, IL: Haymarket Books, 2012. Print. “This book, written by teacher activists, speaks back to that elite consensus. It draws on the ideas and experiences of social justice educators concerned with fighting against racism and for equality, and those of activists oriented on recapturing the radical roots of the labor movement. Informed by a revolutionary vision of pedagogy, schools, and education, it paints a radical critique of education in Corporate America, past and present, and contributes to a vision of alternatives for education and liberation.” – Publisher’s Website
  4. Berg, Kim, and Edward J. Dirkswager. Trusting teachers with school success: what happens when teachers call the shots. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2013. Print. “Trusting Teachers comes to us at a critical juncture in the dialogue about the future of education in the United States. The authors examine what happens when teachers not only receive authority over their individual classrooms, but become a part of the school’s decision making structure. While many school systems push authority upwards to administration and accountability for results downwards onto individual teachers, Trusting Teachers shows us what can happen when authority and accountability are brought together and teachers have a seat at every table.” ~ Linda Darling-Hammond, Professor at Stanford University School of Education
  5. Brooks, Jacqueline Grennon. Schooling for life reclaiming the essence of learning. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2002. Print. “-When did we decide test scores were more important than understanding? -When did we accept the image of teachers as mere implementers of state curricula? -When did we accept the idea that schools are places where no one has to think too hard? This book is a rallying cry to our true educational mission. It’s an assertion that we can have the schools we really want if we’re bold enough to look beyond the myths of what a good school is, and instead, work to facilitate intellectual, ethical, and aesthetic growth in our students and ourselves. Author Jacqueline Grennon Brooks goes inside the classroom to share the experiences of teachers, parents, and students and to present contrasting examples of schooling that honors the complexity of learning and life and schooling that ignores it. It’s a journey that will inspire the reexamination of practices and the revitalization of schools.” ~ Amazon
  6. Costa, Arthur L., and Bena Kallick. Assessing & reporting on habits of mind. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2000. Print. Teachers highly recommend the entire series of Costa and Kallick’s “Habits of Mind”.
  7. Costa, Arthur L., and Bena Kallick. Integrating & sustaining habits of mind. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2000. Print. Teachers highly recommend the entire series of Costa and Kallick’s “Habits of Mind”.
  8. Costa, Arthur L., and Bena Kallick. Discovering & exploring habits of mind. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2000. Print. Teachers highly recommend the entire series of Costa and Kallick’s “Habits of Mind”.
  9. Costa, Arthur L., and Bena Kallick. Activating & engaging habits of mind. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2000. Print. Teachers highly recommend the entire series of Costa and Kallick’s “Habits of Mind”.

10. Costa, Arthur L., and Bena Kallick. Habits of mind across the curriculum practical and creative strategies for teachers. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2009. Print. Teachers highly recommend the entire series of Costa and Kallick’s “Habits of Mind”.

11. Daniel Tatum, Beverly. Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? . New York, NY: Basic Books, 2003. Print. “Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see black youth seated together in the cafeteria. Of course, it’s not just the black kids sitting together-the white, Latino, Asian Pacific, and, in some regions, American Indian youth are clustered in their own groups, too. The same phenomenon can be observed in college dining halls, faculty lounges, and corporate cafeterias. What is going on here?” ~ book description, Amazon

12. Delpit, Lisa D.. Other people’s children: cultural conflict in the classroom. New York: New Press :, 1995. Print. “Children of color, as well as poor children?”other people’s children”?are often victimized by school administrators and others who see “damaged and dangerous caricatures” instead of able youngsters who are capable of learning in a mainstream setting. This is the observation of Delpit, who has used her varied experience in schools from New Guinea to Alaska to better understand and resolve cultural clashes in American classrooms. In the provocative essays collected here, Delpit unfolds her views on teaching African American children, based on professional research and her own experience of school as an alien environment. Defining the goal of educators as celebration, not merely toleration, of diversity in the classroom, Delpit illustrates ways that teachers, including African Americans, can build on students’ home cultures to help prepare them for life after school. The author’s vision of alternative perspectives should stimulate rethinking the complexities of multicultural inclusiveness. Delpit is Benjamin E. Mays Chair of Urban Educational Leadership at Georgia State Univ. Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.” ~ Publishers Weekly

13. Delpit, Lisa D.. “Multiplication is for white people”: raising expectations for other people’s children. New York: New Press :, 2012. Print. ” In her long-awaited and now bestselling second book, “Multiplication Is for White People,” the award-winning educator reflects on the last fifteen years of reform efforts—including No Child Left Behind, standardized testing, alternative teacher certification paths, and the charter school movement—that have left a generation of poor children of color feeling that higher educational achievement is not for them. Hailed as “illuminating” (Publishers Weekly), “thought-provoking” (Harvard Educational Review), and a “much-needed review of the American educational system” (Kirkus Reviews), “Multiplication Is for White People” is a passionate reminder that there is no achievement gap at birth. Poor teaching, negative stereotypes, and a curriculum that does not adequately connect to poor children’s lives conspire against the prospects of poor children of color. From K-12 classrooms through the college years, Delpit brings the topic of educating other people’s children into the twenty-first century, outlining a blueprint for raising expectations based on a simple premise: that all aspects of advanced education are for everyone.” ~ book description excerpt, Amazon

14. Dewey, John. Democracy and education: an introduction to the philosophy of education.. New York: The Free Press;, 19661944. Print. “Perhaps the fact that this great work receives so little attention is indicative of what ails education: educators focus their attention on all the latest drivel concerning education while only paying lip service to Dewey, who remains the highest-ranking educational philosopher.” ~ Hairy Growler, Amazon Reviews

15. Emery, Kathy, and Susan Ohanian. Why is Corporate America bashing our schools? . Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2004. Print. “An invaluable combo of information and fiery inspiration, this book equips us to resist the business powers that be coiling themselves around public schools to squeeze out all respectful, individual teaching.”–Carol Bly, Author of Changing the Bully Who Rules the World

16. Giroux, Henry A.. Disposable youth, racialized memories, and the culture of cruelty. New York, NY: Routledge, 2012. Print. “Facing a crisis unlike that of any other generation, young people are caught between the discourses of consumerism and a powerful crime-control-complex, and are viewed increasingly as commodities or are subjected to the dictates of an ever expanding criminal justice system. Drawing upon critical analyses, biography, and social theory, Disposable Youth explores the current conditions of young people now face within an emerging culture of privatization, insecurity, and commodification and raises some important questions regarding the role that educators, young people, and concerned citizens might play in challenging the plight of young people, while deepening and extending the promise of a better future and a viable democracy.” ~ book description, Amazon

17. Giroux, Henry A.. Education and the crisis of public values: challenging the assault on teachers, students, & public education. New York: Peter Lang, 2012. Print. “I have been reading Henry A. Giroux for decades and in this book he has never been better nor clearer at illuminating the forces that are impairing our democracy and helping to destroy our public schools. ‘Education and the Crisis of Public Values’ is a marvelously insightful examination of the forces that have changed our nation’s teachers from citizens whom we admired, into objects of humiliation, a profession to be shamed and blamed for problems created by our businesses and the politicians who they influence. This trend must be reversed or we lose a necessary part of what makes our democracy possible.” ~ David Berliner

18. Goyal, Nikhil. One Size Does Not Fit All: A Student’s Assessment of School. unknown: Bravura Books, 2012. Print. “What a wonderful book! I nominate Nikhil Goyal for the U.S. Secretary of Education!” — Diane Ravitch, former Assistant Secretary of Education

19. Grisham, John. The appeal. New York: Doubleday, 2008. Print. “I added this book to Gates’ list: The Appeal, By John Grisham. It’s all about people who have lots and lots of money, but who never seem to have enough.” ~ Stephen Krashen

20. Hammond, Linda. The flat world and education: how America’s commitment to equity will determine our future. New York: Teachers College Press, 2010. Print. “Starred Review. Examining in detail issues like equality of spending, testing in K-12 education, and teacher preparation, Stanford education professor Darling-Hammond (The Right to Learn) makes a clear, organized argument that, “like manufacturing industries that have struggled and gone under in recent decades, modern schools were designed at the turn of the last century,” and are in desperate need of transformation.” ~ Publishers Weekly

21. Klein, Naomi. The shock doctrine: the rise of disaster capitalism. New York: Metropolitan Books/Henry Holt, 2007. Print. Privatization and corporate education reform took root with Milton Friedman in Louisiana after Katrina.

22. Kohl, Herbert R.. Stupidity and tears: teaching and learning in troubled times. New York: New Press :, 2003. Print. A remarkable teacher who discovered in his first teaching assignment that in education he could keep playing with toys, didn’t have to stop learning and could use what he knew in the service of others.—Lisa Delpit on Herbert Kohl in The New York Times Book Review

23. Kohn, Alfie. Punished by rewards: the trouble with gold stars, incentive plans, A’s, praise, and other bribes. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1993. Print. “Every parent, teacher, and manager should read this book — and hurry.” — Thomas Gordon, founder of Parent Effectiveness Training

24. Kozol, Jonathan. Savage inequalities: children in America’s schools. New York: Crown Pub., 1991. Print.”In Savage Inequalities, Kozol delivers a searing examination of the extremes of wealth and poverty and calls into question the reality of equal opportunity in our nation’s schools.” ~ Amazon

25. Kozol, Jonathan. The shame of the nation: the restoration of apartheid schooling in America. New York: Crown Publishers, 2005. Print. “Since the early 1980s, when the federal courts began dismantling the landmark ruling in Brown v. Board of Education, segregation of black children has reverted to its highest level since 1968. In many inner-city schools, a stick-and-carrot method of behavioral control traditionally used in prisons is now used with students. Meanwhile, as high-stakes testing takes on pathological and punitive dimensions, liberal education has been increasingly replaced by culturally barren and robotic methods of instruction that would be rejected out of hand by schools that serve the mainstream of society.” ~ book description, Amazon

26. Krashen, Stephen D.. Free voluntary reading. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Libraries Unlimited, 2011. Print.”Free voluntary reading looks better and more powerful than ever. Stephen D. Krashen, PhD, is an advocate for free voluntary reading in schools and has published many journal articles on the subject. Free Voluntary Reading: Power 2010 collects the last ten years of his extensive work and reconsiders all aspects of this important debate in light of the latest findings. The book provides an accessible examination of topics, such as free voluntary reading’s value in language and literary acquisition domestically and worldwide, recent developments in support of free voluntary reading, whether rewards-based programs benefit the development of lifelong reading, the value of phonics in reading instruction, and trends in literacy in the United States.” ~ book description,

27. Lipman, Pauline. The new political economy of urban education neoliberalism, race, and the right to the city. New York: Routledge, 2011. Print. “Urban education and its contexts have changed in powerful ways. Old paradigms are being eclipsed by global forces of privatization and markets and new articulations of race, class, and urban space. These factors and more set the stage for Pauline Lipman’s insightful analysis of the relationship between education policy and the neoliberal economic, political, and ideological processes that are reshaping cities in the United States and around the globe.” ~ book description, Amazon

28. Mehta, Jal. The allure of order: high hopes, dashed expectations, and the troubled quest to remake American schooling. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Print. Jal Mehta, is a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The book “describes how, from the Progressive Era to the Great Society to the age of NCLB, reformers have been fascinated by the promise of scientific management and have attempted to apply principles of rational administration from above. Each of these movements started with high hopes and ambitious promises but gradually discovered that schooling is not easy to “order” from afar. Policymakers are too far from schools to know what they need; teachers are resistant to top-down mandates; and the practice of good teaching is too complex for simple external standardization.”

29. Meier, Deborah, and George H. Wood. Many children left behind: how the No Child Left Behind Act is damaging our children and our schools. Boston: Beacon Press, 2004. Print. “A citizens’ guide to what’s wrong with the nation’s radical federal education legislation—and a passionate call for change.” ~ Amazon

30. Meier, Deborah, Brenda S. Engel, and Beth Taylor. Playing for keeps: life and learning on a public school playground. New York: Teachers College Press, 2010. Print. ”Three experienced and wise educators have written a book that reveals for us the essence of childhood. In the barren days of racing to the top, this engaging book reminds us of what education could so easily be.” -Eleanor Duckworth, Harvard University, author of The Having of Wonderful Ideas and other Essays on Teaching and Learning, Third Edition

31. Nielsen, Kris L.. Children of the Core. New York, NY: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013. Print. A blistering attack on the Common Core State Standards!

32. Ohanian, Susan. One size fits few: the folly of educational standards. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1999. Print. “One Size Fits Few by Susan Ohanian contains more citations than I’ve ever seen in a single reading! One can’t accuse this author of not doing her research before writing this book. Virtually every statement she makes is backed up by a reference to a well known public figure or educator. Throughout the book, the author makes numerous cases against the use of educational standards. At the heart of these multifarious denouncements is the recurring theme that standards are dehumanizing. At one point she reminds us of some essential life skills that are usually ignored when standards are created: “The great words of teaching are the one syllable ones: read, write, teach, learn, work, skill, care, help, hope, trust, faith, love. And the greatest of these, of course, is love.” (p.127)” ~ Patricia Brattan

33. Ohanian, Susan. What happened to recess and why are our children struggling in kindergarten. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2002. Print. “Union members, Army recruits, even trained animals get scheduled breaks during their workday. But not schoolchildren. With an increasing focus on standardized tests, many educators say there simply isn’t time for fun and games. So preoccupied are they with preparing children for tests, that the very concept of recess is regarded as superfluous. What Happened to Recess and Why Are Out Children Struggling in Kindergarten? is both a poignant commentary on the present state of our children’s education and a useful tool to help the adults change it. From California to Chicago to New York, teachers complain that they “teach to the tests, not to the children.” Education should be a process, they point out, not a commodity. The pro-standards faction isn’t listening. The result? The act of educating is giving way to a reckless method that more resembles job training. The need for change is urgent.” ~ As taken from the back cover

34. Owens, John. Confessions of a bad teacher: the shocking truth from the front lines of American public education. Chicago, IL: Sourcebooks, 2013. Print. “This book is an absolute must-read for anyone who cares about the American public education system. Both a jolt of reality and a rallying cry, Confessions of a Bad teacher pulls back the curtain and exposes the dangerous truth behind many of the current data-driven “reform” efforts. John Owen’s honest and compelling memoir needs to be read; but, more importantly, it needs to be discussed.” ~ Danielle, Goodreads review

35. Palmer, Parker J.. The courage to teach: exploring the inner landscape of a teacher’s life. San Francisco, Calif.: Jossey-Bass, 1998. Print. “This book is for teachers who have good days and bad — and whose bad days bring the suffering that comes only from something one loves. It is for teachers who refuse to harden their hearts, because they love learners, learning, and the teaching life.” — Parker J. Palmer [from the Introduction]

36. Pink, Daniel H.. A whole new mind: why right-brainers will rule the future. New York: Riverhead Books, 2006. Print. “The future belongs to a different kind of person with a different kind of mind: artists, inventors, storytellers-creative and holistic “right-brain” thinkers whose abilities mark the fault line between who gets ahead and who doesn’t. Drawing on research from around the world, Pink (author of To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Motivating Others) outlines the six fundamentally human abilities that are absolute essentials for professional success and personal fulfillment–and reveals how to master them. A Whole New Mind takes readers to a daring new place, and a provocative and necessary new way of thinking about a future that’s already here.” ~ book description, Amazon

37. Pink, Daniel H.. Drive: the surprising truth about what motivates us. New York, NY: Riverhead Books, 2009. Print. “Most people believe that the best way to motivate is with rewards like money—the carrot-and-stick approach. That’s a mistake, says Daniel H. Pink (author of To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Motivating Others). In this provocative and persuasive new book, he asserts that the secret to high performance and satisfaction-at work, at school, and at home—is the deeply human need to direct our own lives, to learn and create new things, and to do better by ourselves and our world. Drawing on four decades of scientific research on human motivation, Pink exposes the mismatch between what science knows and what business does—and how that affects every aspect of life. He examines the three elements of true motivation—autonomy, mastery, and purpose-and offers smart and surprising techniques for putting these into action in a unique book that will change how we think and transform how we live.” ~ book description, Amazon

38. Postman, Neil. The end of education: redefining the value of school. New York: Knopf, 1995. Print.”Postman suggests that the current crisis in our educational system derives from its failure to supply students with a translucent, unifying “narrative” like those that inspired earlier generations. Instead, today’s schools promote the false “gods” of economic utility, consumerism, or ethnic separatism and resentment. What alternative strategies can we use to instill our children with a sense of global citizenship, healthy intellectual skepticism, respect of America’s traditions, and appreciation of its diversity? In answering this question, The End of Education restores meaning and common sense to the arena in which they are most urgently needed.” ~ Amazon

39. Prelutsky, Jack, Lane Smith, and Dr. Seuss. Hooray for Diffendoofer Day!. New York, NY: Knopf :, 1998. Print. “Above all, this incredible book is an ode to unorthodox, unusually creative teachers, and the innovative thinking they encourage in young minds. (Miss Twining, for example, teaches “how to tell chrysanthemums from miniature poodles.”) It is a noble theme, and one that Geisel surely had in mind when he concocted these preliminary sketches.” ~ Amazon

40. Ravitch, Diane. The death and life of the great American school system: how testing and choice are undermining education. New York: Basic Books, 2010. Print. Most recommended by teachers, this book is “Destined to Become the Most Influential Book on Education Reform in Memory”.

41. Ravitch, Diane. Reign of error. S.l.: Alfred A Knopf, 2013. Print. From Amazon: “From the former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Education, “whistleblower extraordinaire” (The Wall Street Journal), one of the foremost authorities on education and the history of education in the United States, author of the best-selling The Death and Life of the Great American School System; The Language Police (“Impassioned . . . Fiercely argued . . . Every bit as alarming as it is illuminating” –The New York Times); and the now-classic Great School Wars: A History of the New York City Public Schools–an incisive, comprehensive look at today’s American public schools that argues persuasively against those who claim our public school system is broken, beyond repair, and obsolete; an impassioned but reasoned call to stop the rising “privatization movement” draining students–and funding–from our public schools, a book that puts forth a detailed plan of what needs to happen to schools and with public policy to insure the survival of this American institution so basic to our democracy.”

42. Robinson, Ken, and Lou Aronica. The element: how finding your passion changes everything. New York: Viking, 2009. Print. “Drawing on the stories of a wide range of people, including Paul McCartney, Matt Groening, Richard Branson, Arianna Huffington, and Bart Conner, he shows that age and occupation are no barrier and that this is the essential strategy for transform­ing education, business, and communities in the twenty-first century.” ~ Amazon

43. Sahlberg, Pasi, and Andy Hargreaves. Finnish lessons: what can the world learn from educational change in Finland?. New York: Teachers College Press, 2011. Print. ”This book is a wake-up call for the United States. Finland went from mediocre academic results to one of the top performers in the world. And they did it with unions, minimal testing, national collaboration, and elevating teaching to a high-status calling. This is the antidote to the NCLB paralysis.” –Henry M. Levin, Teachers College, Columbia University

44. Smith, Frank. Insult to intelligence: the bureaucratic invasion of our classrooms. New York: Arbor House, 1986. Print. Teachers want the public back in public education and the corporations to take a back seat with minimal control over all education policy and politics. We want autonomy in our profession with public input.

45. Terkel, Studs. American dreams, lost and found. New York: Pantheon Books, 1980. Print. The best of Terkel’s works. A stirring, hopeful book. — Robert Sherrill, front page, New York Times Book Review

46. Weiner, Lois. The future of our schools: teachers unions and social justice. Chicago, IL: Haymarket Books, 2012. Print. “Lois Weiner has written the book we need right now. Drawing on scholarship and experience, Weiner outlines the potential power of teacher unions to reverse the corporate assault on public education and the necessity to transform the narrow business unionism that stands in the way. Everyone fighting to reclaim public education should read it.”—Pauline Lipman, professor, University of Illinois, Chicago

47. Zemelman, Steven, Harvey Daniels, Arthur A. Hyde, and William Varner. Best practice: new standards for teaching and learning in America’s schools. 2nd ed. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1998. Print.

So we recommend that you two avid readers get your nose in a book, get busy reading from our list this summer and share them with your Reformy Billionaire friends.  We recommend a Book Study.  Talk among yourselves, and shift your thinking.

Here is a reading log to record the books you have read.  We know you are into “carrots and sticks” so we have included some rewards for you, built into your reading log.  Be sure to enjoy these “carrots”!

One teacher makes this suggestion:

“Mr. Gates it is nice that you are providing a summer reading list for children. I am also happy to see that you are a summer reader. I would like to invite you to do something else over the summer. Please take about a week to reevaluate your education policies launched through the Gates Foundation. Some of them are destroying public education in this country. I invite you to speak to real teachers and return them back to the table of education policy making. So put your book down for a week and speak to “real” teachers then please take another week and ask the Gates Foundation to revisit their education policy.”

~ Marla Massey Kilfoyle

That’s your summer assignment, Bill and Melinda.  That’s your summer assignment Reformy Billionaires.  Get reading and start preparing, because … there will be a high stakes multiple choice test prepared by teachers to follow. [We couldn’t forget the “stick”, right?]

Sincerely,

Teachers’ Letters to Bill Gates

P.S.  Teachers were adding more books to your list, Bill and Melinda.  I updated the annotated bibliography this morning, 6-27-13.  Teachers, you can add more to the comment section and I will include them below this post script.

Krishnamurti’s Education and the Significance of Life should be read by everyone connected to education. It is pure teaching and learning with no jargon or acronyms. It is a beautifully clear description of what it means to have the opportunity to teach. Bill Gates may be inspired to trust teachers after reading this brilliant piece.” ~ Anthony Griffin

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“Last summer, I read Yong Zhao’s “World Class Learners: Educating Creative and Entrepreneurial Students.”

Right now, I am retreading Charles Silberman’s “Crisis in the Classroom.”

Plan to finish it and look at an old John Holt book or two before Diane Ravitch’s new book comes out.” ~ Tim McFarland

                            —————————————————————————————————————-
From Opt-Out Teach-In on Facebook:
ANALYSIS/ACTIONSummer Reading List: Books for Billionaires

Not the SUMMER TEACH IN Reading List (below/STI Element 1), which features links to articles rather than books, but an extremely powerful resource. Reading Lists everywhere! What did you expect from a bunch of teachers in revolt?

STI (SUMMER TEACH IN) Reading List:
http://summerteachin.tumblr.com/post/53533577197/summer-teach-in-reading-list

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A post script from Rethinking Schools: “Many excellent recommendations here. We humbly recommend two of our own books: Pencils Down: Rethinking High-Stakes Testing and Accountability in Public Schools, edited by Wayne Au and Melissa Bollow Tempel; and The New Teacher Book: Finding Purpose, Balance, and Hope During Your First Years in the Classroom, edited by Terry Burant, Linda Christensen, Kelley Dawson Salas, and Stephanie Walters. Also, one by our friend and former managing editor Barbara Miner: Lessons from the Heartland: A Turbulent Half-Century of Public Education in an Iconic American City (published by The New Press).”
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About Highlighting Members' Needs

We are running for the following Renton Education Association positions because we believe in the following planks: Becca Ritchie, Candidate for REA President, Nelsen Middle School, Computer Tech Susan DuFresne, Candidate for Primary Executive Board, Maplewood Heights Elementary, Integrated Kindergarten ✅  Demanding a healthy work-load/life balance. ✅  Bargaining competitive professional compensation. ✅  Challenging the status quo test culture with: Less is more! ✅  Emphasizing our professional expertise. ✅  Prioritizing equity and access for all. ✅  Utilizing 2-way 21st century communication tools. ✅  Acting in solidarity with all unions. ✅  Supporting ALL members. ✅   Implementing developmentally appropriate K-3 curriculum/assessment.
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11 Responses to Teachers’ Summer Reading List for Reformy Billionaires: Books to Inspire Billionaires to Change their Reformy Ideas — Multiple Choice Test to Follow

  1. timmcfarland says:

    Last summer, I read Yong Zhao’s “World Class Learners: Educating Creative and Entrepreneurial Students.”

    Right now, I am retreading Charles Silberman’s “Crisis in the Classroom.”

    Plan to finish it and look at an old John Holt book or two before Diane Ravitch’s new book comes out.

    • Teachers'LettersToBillGates says:

      Thank you, Tim! I will add these to our list of recommended reading!

      Teachers’ Letters to Bill Gates

  2. Anthony Griffin says:

    Krishnamurti’s Education and the Significance of Life should be read by everyone connected to education. It is pure teaching and learning with no jargon or acronyms. It is a beautifully clear description of what it means to have the opportunity to teach. Bill Gates may be inspired to trust teachers after reading this brilliant piece.

  3. Teachers'LettersToBillGates says:

    from Katie: The Allure of Order: High Hopes, Dashed Expectations, and the Troubled Quest to Remake American Schooling (OUP, 2013) by Jal Mehta, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The book “describes how, from the Progressive Era to the Great Society to the age of NCLB, reformers have been fascinated by the promise of scientific management and have attempted to apply principles of rational administration from above. Each of these movements started with high hopes and ambitious promises but gradually discovered that schooling is not easy to “order” from afar. Policymakers are too far from schools to know what they need; teachers are resistant to top-down mandates; and the practice of good teaching is too complex for simple external standardization.”

  4. kellyflynn1 says:

    I would like to recommend The Teachers’ Lounge (Uncensored): A Funny, Edgy, Poignant Look at Life in the Classroom, by Kelly Flynn. The book includes a badass foreword by Nancy Carlsson-Paige. It was also chosen by the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International as one of its Top 5 Must Reads for 2013. The book honors teachers and recognizes their challenges, takes policymakers to task for passing destructive education policy, and has a strong anti-testing message.

    https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781475800333

  5. You can certainly see your expertise within the work you write.
    The world hopes for even more passionate writers such as you who aren’t afraid to say how they believe. At all times follow your heart.

  6. Many excellent recommendations here. We humbly recommend two of our own books: Pencils Down: Rethinking High-Stakes Testing and Accountability in Public Schools, edited by Wayne Au and Melissa Bollow Tempel; and The New Teacher Book: Finding Purpose, Balance, and Hope During Your First Years in the Classroom, edited by Terry Burant, Linda Christensen, Kelley Dawson Salas, and Stephanie Walters. Also, one by our friend and former managing editor Barbara Miner: Lessons from the Heartland: A Turbulent Half-Century of Public Education in an Iconic American City (published by The New Press).

    • Teachers'LettersToBillGates says:

      Thank you for your excellent suggestions. I will add them to our post script on the blog above. We regard your work at Rethinking Schools very highly!

      Teachers’ Letters to Bill Gates

  7. Pingback: Our Top 10 from 2013, but Bill Gates is Still Not Making Nice with Teachers | Teachers' Letters to Bill Gates

  8. Pingback: WaBATS are Leading a Movement: #EducatingGates Foundation Rally – June 26th! | Teachers' Letters to Bill Gates

  9. Pingback: Bill Gates’ Summer Reading List Showed Up in Bill’s Twitter Feed (with Minor Revisions) | Teachers' Letters to Bill Gates

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